Startup BizCast #51 – Blogger Relations (Steve Mullen)

I’ve talked a lot on this podcast about how to make your business blog work for you, but what about using other people’s blogs to promote your business? That’s this week’s topic on Startup BizCast. I go solo to talk about what a successful blogger relations campaign can do for you, and give some tips on how to properly contact bloggers to try to get them to write a blog post about your company.

In BizCast Brief this week: Canadians rejecting a carbon tax, small business employees more likely to endanger company computers, and eBay auction businesses may be in danger.

Websites mentioned in this week’s episode:
E-business Ideas (http://web-ebiz.blogspot.com)
Fight SMA (www.fightsma.org)
Perez Hilton’s post about Fight SMA (http://perezhilton.com/2008-05-26-a-worthwhile-cause-67)
Media Relations and SEO PR Blog (http://www.endgamepr.com/blog)
Google Blog Search (http://blogsearch.google.com)
Technorati (http://www.technorati.com)

Don’t forget to email me YOUR advice. I’ll talk about submitted advice in a future episode!

Startup BizCast’s theme music is “Entranced” by Blake Emrys. The full version of the song, along with other music by the same artist, can be downloaded at Podsafe Music Network.

Startup BizCast is produced by BizPodz, the corporate podcast production service from EndGame Public Relations, LLC. For more information on how your business can take advantage of the social media revolution, please visit www.endgamepr.com/podcasts.


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2 Responses to “Startup BizCast #51 – Blogger Relations (Steve Mullen)”

  1. I listened to the the full interview with author Susan Wilson Solovic about women in small business, and found it very informative. She is – like many women in business today – articulate, has a sense of humor, and is quite pleasant to listen to. Great voice, keeps people engaged.

    Something she said made a lot of sense to me, and was the reason I decided to open my own business: the fact that I felt passionate about what I do, and knew I could do it better than anyone else. That certitude kept me going when the inevitable obstacles appeared; it was what kept me going.

    Susan had two other great points: we women are affected by specific nuances in our lives, such as being – in most cases – responsible for raising children. As she said, the corporate life doesn’t always give us the flexibility we need, and that is probably one of the reasons why we are starting our own business and being successful at it.

    Her advice against trying to do it all alone was also right on target. We women tend to do that, and I certainly made the same mistake. But I soon realized that there were areas I could not cover – technology and marketing, for instance. Today I have great people helping me with that, so I can use my time doing what I do best – plan the most exciting and interesting luxury tours for small groups.

    Thanks Susan, for your smart advice and suggestions

  2. Thanks so much for your feedback on that interview, and your advice. It means a lot!

    Steve Mullen